michael gallucci

CULTURE JAMMING — FEBRUARY 24

In Uncategorized on 02/24/2010 at 8:00 am

TOP PICK

Wilson Pickett: Funky Midnight Mover – The Atlantic Studio Recordings (1962-1978)

(Rhino Handmade)

Pickett is one of R&B’s all-time greats. This six-CD box includes everything he recorded for Atlantic Records during his peak. All of the hits are here – “In the Midnight Hour,” “Mustang Sally,” “Land of 1000 Dances” – but so are tons of soul gems waiting to be mined. Dig deep among the 154 songs for more than a dozen previously unreleased tracks.

MUSIC

The Flaming Lips & Stardeath and White Dwarf: Dark Side of the Moon

(Warner Bros.)

The Flaming Lips recently got together with some pals (including Peaches and Henry Rollins) to remake Pink Floyd’s 1973 classic. And they somehow manage to out-freak the original. If some of the nuances of Floyd’s version are steamrolled over on this digital-only release, the Lips still deliver a sonic blitzkrieg worthy of your next trip.

VIDEO GAME

Heavy Rain

(Sony)

One of the most ambitious videogames you’ll ever play (for the PlayStation 3) is about a missing boy who could end up an origami-loving serial killer’s latest victim. The outcome is in players’ hands, as you make decisions that steer the narrative in various directions. The storytelling is incredibly detailed; the gameplay is even more so.

DVD

Elvis

(Shout! Factory)

Before Kurt Russell and director John Carpenter teamed up for Escape From New York, they made this 1979 TV movie about the King, who died two years earlier. Russell seems to be having the time of his life as the lip-quivering Presley (he was even nominated for an Emmy). The biopic finally makes its DVD debut. Look for Ed Begley Jr. and Joe Mantegna.

DVD

A Serious Man

(Universal)

The Coen brothers’ latest – about a guy whose personal and professional lives are unraveling – is filled with the filmmakers’ usual batch of fractured characters. But unlike their past few movies, this dark comedy keeps its cast and temperament low-key. It’s also one of the Coens’ most personal films, which they discuss in detail in one of the Blu-ray’s extras.

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